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Life Underground

When we drive along the Stuart Highway to Coober Pedy, we are always amazed at the changing landscape. Silly me, I forget the gadget that downloads my big camera photos to my iPad so I have to post them later.

I have booked us into the Cave Observation Underground Motel. Our room was fantastic but too modern to give us an appreciation of what it really was like living underground. The fan must be 24/7 to circulate the air and keep the room cool because it is constant 25 degrees underground. I was a little worried when every morning there would be chips from the wall on the floor and bed. Unfortunately we did not find opals.

We toured our first day mail run. The tour is run by a local man named Peter who is an Australian Post Contractor who sends letters to Oodnadatta and Willian Creek as well as remote livestock stations including the words ‘largest Anna Creek Station’ that crosses the longest man-made structure in the world, Dingo fence. The tour also includes stopping to see the old Ghan Railroad relics. I was amazed at the Algebuckina Bridge. This bridge was built by our room
in the 1800s and still stands today. All wood beds have not survived but are still enough to impress. It’s nice to stop at various properties that send letters, chat with owners and workers. Even farm dogs like extra attention.

more travel blog ATV ADVENTURE AT TABANAN, BALI

After sleeping well we decided to look around the city and check out the local scenery. There are a number of film props around the city and the easiest to find is a starship from Pitch Black. We examined the Catacomb Underground Church and cemetery. The highlight is watching Joey feed at Josephine’s Gallery and Kangaroo Orphanage. I was lucky enough to feed one of the older kangaroos and received a kiss from Joey who was very loving. The orphanage is run by volunteers and survivors with donations. They had just received a small Joey that day found in his mother’s bag that had been killed by several tourists. While we were in town we saw several tour buses and realized that they were from Ghan … it would be us in a few weeks.

Loch Lomond, Loch Ness, Glencoe and puppies

Today our trip to the edge of Bonnie Bonnie on Loch Lomond begins with an unusual sight, the sun. This is the first morning where old Sol decides to bless us with his presence. Great Scottish green under a clear sky.

A word about the Tour Director. Imaging does work where you act as a mother to 30 people you have never met, all of whom have ideas about travel, food, holidays, accommodation, and needs. Also imagine, that you are on call 24 hours a day, must plan activities every day, and make sure everyone is safe, happy, and on time. This is only a small concept from the Tour Director’s work. No matter what tour company you use, the Tour Director is very important for quality and enjoying your tour.

To add insult to injury, Tour Directors were not properly compensated for the amount of work they did mainly because they were very important for the success of the tour experience. They are expected to be experienced in history, archeology, culinary expertise, safety, culture and various other skills. They also work 14, 20 or 24 consecutive days without holidays. They must prepare their own talks about the tour and make all arrangements for dinner, optional and everything that makes the tour successful. Not everyone can be a tour director, so, for those, like Tom, who do extraordinary work, they deserve special thanks and make sure you tell them how much you appreciate their hard work and make sure you value them with your tip, they really rely on this percent.

Our first stop is Loch Lomond. We left the luxury of our coach and took a private ferry to tour the lake for 45 minutes. One must have a direct relationship with the gods of the weather, because when the coach rains, when we go down it stops, when we return to the coach it rains again. So for the gods, “Thank you.”

The cruise revolves around the important part of the loch. Along the way our captain, Stewart, showed historic and beautiful places of interest. We also learned that the prefix INVER means on the river, so Inverness means the city on the river Ness. It’s good to know when we travel around Scotland. The beauty of the lake, coupled with the majesty of the storm clouds, is made for some extraordinary photos. Once again it rained when we were on the ship. Now, we go to the next stop, go north to Glencoe.

Why Disaster Recovery Should Be Part of Your Holiday Planning

While executives often feel the organization is very ready to recover from data loss or damage, their IT professionals say. Being dark for days at a time can significantly change income income for small businesses, especially during the busy holiday shopping season.

If your small business has a busy holiday shopping season, disaster recovery readiness should be a major part of your vacation planning process. A 2016 survey revealed a huge disconnect between C-suites and IT professionals in terms of how ready they were to think their organization would handle disasters. While almost 70 percent of level C executives feel their organization is “very prepared” to recover from data loss or damage, less than 50 percent of IT professionals in the same organization agree.

Many businesses make the most of their annual income during the Q4 holiday season. Being dark for days at a time can significantly change income income for small businesses. Read on to better understand the risks posed by losing data and what elements small businesses must include in their disaster recovery plans.
The top risk caused by loss of data

With advancements in business software, your business is likely to rely on cloud-based technology to carry out your daily operations. If one of these services goes down, your business can be paralyzed – unable to process sales, offer products or services online, linking your order collection efforts with your order fulfillment operations, or accessing your employees’ salaries to record working hours.

Your data can be permanently lost after an outage or error. In the 2015 Data Violation Investigation Report, Verizon found that small data violations (less than 100 missing files) could cost businesses $ 18,120 to $ 35,730. It’s not a small line item, and it doesn’t even cover a larger data breach. Furthermore, according to the National Archives and Archives Administration, more than 90 percent of companies experience at least seven days of data center downtime out of business in a year.

As businesses increasingly move online and software helps companies process customer preferences and purchase history, your small business can now capture more customer information and financial data than ever before. This data, including the finances of your own business, is very attractive to computer hackers. Hacking skills are becoming more common, and hacking incidents begin to affect large and small businesses. Hackers violate more than 50 percent of 28 million American small businesses, according to the State of SMB Cybersecurity Report 2016. A hacker can not only steal your financial data or customers, but also delete information as a whole to cover their tracks. This can cause your business to face serious operational challenges, especially regarding accounting and tax payments.

Natural disasters such as floods, earthquakes, hurricanes, snowstorms, and other extreme storms can cause data centers or online services to experience downtime as well. Locally stored files, such as those on a server or hard drive, can be easily deleted because of a power surge caused by storms, fire, water damage, or even just dropped or destroyed.

Finally, loss or theft of your customer’s data can harm your business due to lawsuits and fines. For larger businesses, data loss that leads to a significant reduction in company value or shares can result in shareholder lawsuits. Be sure to note whether your business or vendor contract contains a clause related to data protection requirements.
An important element of a disaster recovery plan

Cloud service leverage. Saving data in the cloud and improving cloud-based programs can help businesses solve problems four times faster than businesses that use files or local storage. Data stored in the cloud is not subject to general data loss or causes of damage such as power surges, water damage, fire, or damage solely such as dropping or destroying a hard drive.

While executives often feel organizations are very ready to recover from data loss or damage, their IT professionals say. Being dark for days at a time can significantly change income for small businesses, especially during the busy holiday shopping season.

If your small business has a busy holiday shopping season, disaster recovery readiness should be a major part of your vacation planning process. A 2016 survey revealed a huge disconnect between C-suites and IT professionals in terms of how ready they were to think their organization would handle disasters. While almost 70 percent of level C executives feel their organization is “very prepared” to recover from data loss or damage, less than 50 percent of IT professionals in the same organization agree.

Many businesses make up a large portion of their annual income during the Q4 holiday season. Being dark for days at a time can significantly change income for small businesses. Read on to better understand the risks posed by losing data and what elements small businesses must include in their disaster recovery plans.
The highest risk is caused by loss of data

With advancements in business software, your business tends to rely on cloud-based technology to run your daily operations. If one of these services goes down, your business can be paralyzed – unable to process sales, offer products or services online, connect your order collection efforts with your order fulfillment operations, or access your employees’ salaries to record working hours.

Your data can be lost permanently after a blackout or error. In the 2015 Data Violation Investigation Report, Verizon found that small data violations (less than 100 files missing) could cost businesses $ 18,120 to $ 35,730. This is not a small line item, and does not even cover a larger data breach. Furthermore, according to the National Archives and Administration Agency, more than 90 percent of business companies experience at least seven days of data center downtime from the business in a year.

As businesses increasingly move online and software helps companies process customer preferences and purchase history, your small business can now capture more customer information and financial data than ever before. This data, including the finances of your own business, is very attractive to computer hackers. Hacking skills are becoming more common, and hacking incidents begin to affect large and small businesses. Hackers violate more than 50 percent of 28 million American small businesses, according to the State of the SMB Cybersecurity Report 2016. A hacker can not only steal financial data or your customers, but also delete information as a whole to cover their tracks. This can cause your business to face serious operational challenges, especially related to accounting and payment of taxes.

Natural disasters such as floods, earthquakes, storms, snowstorms, and other extreme storms can cause data centers or online services to experience downtime as well. Locally stored files, such as those on the server or hard drive, can be easily removed because of power surges caused by storms, fire, water damage, or even just falling or breaking.

Finally, loss or theft of your customer’s data can harm your business due to lawsuits and fines. For larger businesses, loss of data that leads to a significant decrease in the value or shares of the company can result in shareholder lawsuits. Be sure to note whether your business or vendor contract contains clauses related to data protection requirements.
An important element of a disaster recovery plan

Cloud service leverage. Saving data in the cloud and improving cloud-based programs can help businesses solve problems four times faster than businesses that use files or local storage. Data stored in the cloud is not subject to general data loss or causes of damage such as power surges, water damage, fire, or damage solely such as dropping or destroying the hard drive.

Deception Pass State Park

Yesterday was our last day at Whidbey. We made a short trip to the Fraud State Park for hiking. This is a nice park with several winding paths along the coast. Beautiful scenery Images speak for themselves.

Whidbey Naval Air Station is a joy to visit. The RV park is one of the best we have ever used. Right on the water and very clean and well maintained. That is the experience of being around this part of the Navy again. Whidbey now has several P3 squadrons and several new P8 squadrons. It also has some new EP3 and F / A 18 Growler. We flew a lot here in the 60s and 70s to take torpedoes and do mining exercises. At that time the post was small and was home to several P2 squadrons. There isn’t much activity. Now it’s busy all the time and lots of traffic. The Navy has changed a lot since I retired in 1994. All sailors are now wearing camouflage uniforms and I can’t say how many people. I go to the head club which is only open 4 days a week. Two camouflage people are
sit at the bar. I don’t even know whether they are tribal chiefs. They looked at me as if I was a bully. I want to tell them that I retired as a Senior Head before they even joined as an E1 pilot. Instead I walked in disgust. That’s not my Navy anymore. I think that’s what happened with age.

Today we drive from Whidbey to Lincoln City Oregon. Easy drive with lots of traffic most of the way. KOA RV Park is good, but not compared to Whidbey. Tomorrow we will go to McMinnville to see the Spruce Goose. After that we plan to visit several major wineries in this area.

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How to QC Your Lead Follow-Up System

A good sales team and sales process are an important part of any small business.

Even if you have a great product or service, you need someone to sell it to potential customers and bring future partners to help your business grow. Part of having a good sales process is quality control, or QC. This is a business term for constant reflection: the sales process, in particular, the follow-up lead process, is one that must always be audited and adjusted. Seeing the whole process as something liquid can help your company stay dynamic and lead to meaningful growth.

“The sales process must be part of the entire organizational culture, because sales aren’t just about finding customers, it’s about finding the right customers,” said Mike Black, CEO and founder of Inciting Marketing Solutions. Black said that he started his company after seeing a gap in the industry, and constant auditing of the entire sales process was one of the factors that led to the overall growth of his company.

Before exploring how to properly analyze internal processes, it is important to understand the nature of QC and why it is an important part of the sales process.
Why is QC important in sales

Part of a good business process is constant improvement. After all, if you can’t recognize inefficiency or inconsistency, adjust your process and your business better, how can you expect your business to succeed? Black said further, “lead making is useless if the sales team can’t close, and all lead has to do with following a reliable sales process.”

Black also said that often a lot of delays or problems with clients are the result of the initial sales process – the sales process must check potential clients to see if they will be good partners as well as selling your own products or services. Naturally, QC is a process where you don’t need to use expensive tools or complicated sales or marketing strategies. Instead, think critically about what your company is fighting for and how your current process is achieving that.

Jan Roos, founder of CaseFuel, broke the importance of QC into an mathematical analogy.

“If you multiply any part of the [sales] equation with zero, the result is zero,” he said. “Knowing your steps in detail allows you to diagnose fields instead of the whole process.”

If you do business, QC must be part of your daily responsibilities. Some companies will introduce certain QC processes to ensure they monitor the clients they receive correctly. Others will do it on an ongoing basis and make QC part of everything they do.
How to audit your main follow-up system

Follow-up lead is an important part of the sales process where salespeople will work with potential clients to showcase their products or services and measure whether potential customers are good partners. Before you start with QCing this process, it is important to reflect on these questions:

What kind of business are you and what do you stand for?
What clients do you currently serve?
Who do you want to serve?

Black said that an important part of the QC process is aligning everything your business does with its unique value proposition. Recognizing your unique value proposition and redefining your goals as a business owner can give you the right lens to analyze your current process.

In general, some businesses will set clear QC and audit plans to constantly review sales, customers or new processes. This can be effective if your business is growing and you need to standardize the type of reflection that you are giving as a business leader. The specified QC plan can also be ideal for businesses that only serve one type of customer – if you only work with certain types of clients, the same strategy can be applied to each transaction and process.

You can start by compiling the specified QC plan for your main follow-up system by considering these points:

How does every salesperson filter potential candidates?
How does each conversation take place during the process?
What is the current follow-up process and does it provide clients that are suitable for our business?
Does my sales team know what type of client is right for our business?

Once you have answers to these questions, you can plan and process to get answers in a sustainable manner.

Black said in Inciting Marketing, the QC process is more sustainable and does not follow a rigid process. Black will analyze every new agreement and new customer, as well as the entire sales and inspection process, at weekly meetings with his staff. He also said he would use this time to understand how to better serve current clients. If there are customers or clients who do not exercise, Black is not afraid to cut it.