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For the Average Traveler Who Needs Money Saving Travel Tips

Many families are finding it hard to come up with the money to take a vacation, with the rise in prices for almost everything in the last few years. But taking a vacation does not have to be expensive. There are many money saving travel tips to be found to save the average traveler a lot of money.

Regardless of age or income, everyone can benefit from money saving travel tips. Whether aiming for a four-star, week-long vacation or a weekend getaway, there are travel tips that can save you money to be found with a little searching. These tips can save you money on everything from hotels, to airfare, to food.

Money Saving Travel Tips For Lodging

One of the best money saving travel tips for saving money on lodging is compare prices. Prices for hotel rooms can vary greatly, even if the hotels are located close to each other. If booking a hotel room online, check several different sites for the same hotel rooms. Chances are the price on one site will be lower than the prices on other sites. Another way to save is with a Travel Membership.

Another tip for saving on lodging is” try to be flexible”. For example, in Hilton Head, a hotel room with an ocean view is more than twice as much per night than the hotel room with all of the same amenities but without an ocean view directly across the street. If you are intending to spend your vacation days on the beach, an ocean view may not be necessary and that extra money could be spent towards something else. With a little research, money saving travel tips can save you quite a bit of money over the length of your vacation.

Money Saving Travel Tips For Dining

One of the biggest expenses of any vacation is food. With some money saving travel tips and a little prior planning, you can minimize the amount that you will pay for dining. The first tip is to research restaurants in the area before leaving on vacation. This way you know what types of restaurants are in the area and the price ranges for these restaurants. Many people on vacation walk into a restaurant that they have never been in before and pay a much higher price than they intended to spend for the meal. By choosing which restaurants you will eat in before you leave for the trip, you will eliminate the possibility of sticker shock when you see the menu.

One of the most overlooked money saving travel tips for dining is to request from the city you are planning to travel to, a guide to the local restaurants. Many of these guides include money saving coupons to restaurants in the area to entice you into eating there. Whether the coupon is for 10% off or 50% off, they are still saving you money you would have had to spend anyway. By doing a little research and learning some money saving travel tips, a vacation does not have to be as expensive as expected.

You can also get lodging that comes with a fully equipped kitchen, so you can cook some of your own meals. Most places you vacation have a local grocery store or deli near by. This is a great way to save. On a romantic get away you can do breakfast in bed and be spoiled by your love. If you have the family with you, having a kitchen will save you a ton of money on food. Just make sure Mom gets a break from the kitchen. Remember, this is her vacation too.

Why Disaster Recovery Should Be Part of Your Holiday Planning

While executives often feel the organization is very ready to recover from data loss or damage, their IT professionals say. Being dark for days at a time can significantly change income income for small businesses, especially during the busy holiday shopping season.

If your small business has a busy holiday shopping season, disaster recovery readiness should be a major part of your vacation planning process. A 2016 survey revealed a huge disconnect between C-suites and IT professionals in terms of how ready they were to think their organization would handle disasters. While almost 70 percent of level C executives feel their organization is “very prepared” to recover from data loss or damage, less than 50 percent of IT professionals in the same organization agree.

Many businesses make the most of their annual income during the Q4 holiday season. Being dark for days at a time can significantly change income income for small businesses. Read on to better understand the risks posed by losing data and what elements small businesses must include in their disaster recovery plans.
The top risk caused by loss of data

With advancements in business software, your business is likely to rely on cloud-based technology to carry out your daily operations. If one of these services goes down, your business can be paralyzed – unable to process sales, offer products or services online, linking your order collection efforts with your order fulfillment operations, or accessing your employees’ salaries to record working hours.

Your data can be permanently lost after an outage or error. In the 2015 Data Violation Investigation Report, Verizon found that small data violations (less than 100 missing files) could cost businesses $ 18,120 to $ 35,730. It’s not a small line item, and it doesn’t even cover a larger data breach. Furthermore, according to the National Archives and Archives Administration, more than 90 percent of companies experience at least seven days of data center downtime out of business in a year.

As businesses increasingly move online and software helps companies process customer preferences and purchase history, your small business can now capture more customer information and financial data than ever before. This data, including the finances of your own business, is very attractive to computer hackers. Hacking skills are becoming more common, and hacking incidents begin to affect large and small businesses. Hackers violate more than 50 percent of 28 million American small businesses, according to the State of SMB Cybersecurity Report 2016. A hacker can not only steal your financial data or customers, but also delete information as a whole to cover their tracks. This can cause your business to face serious operational challenges, especially regarding accounting and tax payments.

Natural disasters such as floods, earthquakes, hurricanes, snowstorms, and other extreme storms can cause data centers or online services to experience downtime as well. Locally stored files, such as those on a server or hard drive, can be easily deleted because of a power surge caused by storms, fire, water damage, or even just dropped or destroyed.

Finally, loss or theft of your customer’s data can harm your business due to lawsuits and fines. For larger businesses, data loss that leads to a significant reduction in company value or shares can result in shareholder lawsuits. Be sure to note whether your business or vendor contract contains a clause related to data protection requirements.
An important element of a disaster recovery plan

Cloud service leverage. Saving data in the cloud and improving cloud-based programs can help businesses solve problems four times faster than businesses that use files or local storage. Data stored in the cloud is not subject to general data loss or causes of damage such as power surges, water damage, fire, or damage solely such as dropping or destroying a hard drive.

While executives often feel organizations are very ready to recover from data loss or damage, their IT professionals say. Being dark for days at a time can significantly change income for small businesses, especially during the busy holiday shopping season.

If your small business has a busy holiday shopping season, disaster recovery readiness should be a major part of your vacation planning process. A 2016 survey revealed a huge disconnect between C-suites and IT professionals in terms of how ready they were to think their organization would handle disasters. While almost 70 percent of level C executives feel their organization is “very prepared” to recover from data loss or damage, less than 50 percent of IT professionals in the same organization agree.

Many businesses make up a large portion of their annual income during the Q4 holiday season. Being dark for days at a time can significantly change income for small businesses. Read on to better understand the risks posed by losing data and what elements small businesses must include in their disaster recovery plans.
The highest risk is caused by loss of data

With advancements in business software, your business tends to rely on cloud-based technology to run your daily operations. If one of these services goes down, your business can be paralyzed – unable to process sales, offer products or services online, connect your order collection efforts with your order fulfillment operations, or access your employees’ salaries to record working hours.

Your data can be lost permanently after a blackout or error. In the 2015 Data Violation Investigation Report, Verizon found that small data violations (less than 100 files missing) could cost businesses $ 18,120 to $ 35,730. This is not a small line item, and does not even cover a larger data breach. Furthermore, according to the National Archives and Administration Agency, more than 90 percent of business companies experience at least seven days of data center downtime from the business in a year.

As businesses increasingly move online and software helps companies process customer preferences and purchase history, your small business can now capture more customer information and financial data than ever before. This data, including the finances of your own business, is very attractive to computer hackers. Hacking skills are becoming more common, and hacking incidents begin to affect large and small businesses. Hackers violate more than 50 percent of 28 million American small businesses, according to the State of the SMB Cybersecurity Report 2016. A hacker can not only steal financial data or your customers, but also delete information as a whole to cover their tracks. This can cause your business to face serious operational challenges, especially related to accounting and payment of taxes.

Natural disasters such as floods, earthquakes, storms, snowstorms, and other extreme storms can cause data centers or online services to experience downtime as well. Locally stored files, such as those on the server or hard drive, can be easily removed because of power surges caused by storms, fire, water damage, or even just falling or breaking.

Finally, loss or theft of your customer’s data can harm your business due to lawsuits and fines. For larger businesses, loss of data that leads to a significant decrease in the value or shares of the company can result in shareholder lawsuits. Be sure to note whether your business or vendor contract contains clauses related to data protection requirements.
An important element of a disaster recovery plan

Cloud service leverage. Saving data in the cloud and improving cloud-based programs can help businesses solve problems four times faster than businesses that use files or local storage. Data stored in the cloud is not subject to general data loss or causes of damage such as power surges, water damage, fire, or damage solely such as dropping or destroying the hard drive.

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How to QC Your Lead Follow-Up System

A good sales team and sales process are an important part of any small business.

Even if you have a great product or service, you need someone to sell it to potential customers and bring future partners to help your business grow. Part of having a good sales process is quality control, or QC. This is a business term for constant reflection: the sales process, in particular, the follow-up lead process, is one that must always be audited and adjusted. Seeing the whole process as something liquid can help your company stay dynamic and lead to meaningful growth.

“The sales process must be part of the entire organizational culture, because sales aren’t just about finding customers, it’s about finding the right customers,” said Mike Black, CEO and founder of Inciting Marketing Solutions. Black said that he started his company after seeing a gap in the industry, and constant auditing of the entire sales process was one of the factors that led to the overall growth of his company.

Before exploring how to properly analyze internal processes, it is important to understand the nature of QC and why it is an important part of the sales process.
Why is QC important in sales

Part of a good business process is constant improvement. After all, if you can’t recognize inefficiency or inconsistency, adjust your process and your business better, how can you expect your business to succeed? Black said further, “lead making is useless if the sales team can’t close, and all lead has to do with following a reliable sales process.”

Black also said that often a lot of delays or problems with clients are the result of the initial sales process – the sales process must check potential clients to see if they will be good partners as well as selling your own products or services. Naturally, QC is a process where you don’t need to use expensive tools or complicated sales or marketing strategies. Instead, think critically about what your company is fighting for and how your current process is achieving that.

Jan Roos, founder of CaseFuel, broke the importance of QC into an mathematical analogy.

“If you multiply any part of the [sales] equation with zero, the result is zero,” he said. “Knowing your steps in detail allows you to diagnose fields instead of the whole process.”

If you do business, QC must be part of your daily responsibilities. Some companies will introduce certain QC processes to ensure they monitor the clients they receive correctly. Others will do it on an ongoing basis and make QC part of everything they do.
How to audit your main follow-up system

Follow-up lead is an important part of the sales process where salespeople will work with potential clients to showcase their products or services and measure whether potential customers are good partners. Before you start with QCing this process, it is important to reflect on these questions:

What kind of business are you and what do you stand for?
What clients do you currently serve?
Who do you want to serve?

Black said that an important part of the QC process is aligning everything your business does with its unique value proposition. Recognizing your unique value proposition and redefining your goals as a business owner can give you the right lens to analyze your current process.

In general, some businesses will set clear QC and audit plans to constantly review sales, customers or new processes. This can be effective if your business is growing and you need to standardize the type of reflection that you are giving as a business leader. The specified QC plan can also be ideal for businesses that only serve one type of customer – if you only work with certain types of clients, the same strategy can be applied to each transaction and process.

You can start by compiling the specified QC plan for your main follow-up system by considering these points:

How does every salesperson filter potential candidates?
How does each conversation take place during the process?
What is the current follow-up process and does it provide clients that are suitable for our business?
Does my sales team know what type of client is right for our business?

Once you have answers to these questions, you can plan and process to get answers in a sustainable manner.

Black said in Inciting Marketing, the QC process is more sustainable and does not follow a rigid process. Black will analyze every new agreement and new customer, as well as the entire sales and inspection process, at weekly meetings with his staff. He also said he would use this time to understand how to better serve current clients. If there are customers or clients who do not exercise, Black is not afraid to cut it.

Talking Shop: How to Protect Your Small Business from Malware

When running a small business, there are many things that must be focused. Make sales, find new customers and motivate your employees among them; however, keeping your business safe from cyber attacks might take precedence over everything.

That’s because if you are a victim of a cyber attack, you might be out of business altogether. Cyber ​​attacks on small businesses can be crippling. Research shows that 60% of small businesses that are victims of cyber attacks are out of business within six months.

One specific type of cyber attack business that needs attention is malware. Malware is a general term that describes any malicious program or code that is harmful to a company’s system, said Akshay Bhargava, senior vice president of products for Malwarebytes.
Akshay Bhargava

“Malware attempts to attack, destroy, or deactivate computers, computer systems, networks, tablets and cellular devices, often by taking partial control of device operations,” said Bhargava. “Like human flu, it interferes with normal function.”

We recently talked to Bhargava about malware, how it can affect small businesses and how artificial intelligence and machine learning make it more difficult than ever to detect and combat this growing threat. [Are you in the market for internet security software for your company? See our best choices and reviews.]
Increased malware threats for SMEs
Q: How does malware affect small businesses?

A: Small businesses are very vulnerable to threats because they often do not have the resources for products or a broad security team such as larger companies. This is arguably more important for small businesses to protect themselves, because, unfortunately, when these organizations are exposed to malware, it can completely cripple, or end, their business.

In fact, 43% of data violations come from small businesses, according to the 2019 Verizon Data Breach Investigations Report. This means SMEs must fight and do more with less.

read another business post How to QC Your Lead Follow-Up System

The use of personal mobile devices for business use further complicates risks for SMEs. This device gives cyber criminals additional points to enter the organization. Only by opening an email on a mobile device, unsuspecting employees can open the door to critical violations, endangering organizational information, including customer and employee data.

Securing this endpoint with the right policies, protocols and tools for protection is very important. Many small businesses believe that they are too small to be targeted by criminals, but what happens is the opposite. Cybercriminals often target these organizations because SMEs often lack sophisticated and layered security practices, making it easier to get sensitive data they hold.
Q: How does artificial intelligence and machine learning affect the type of malware used by cyber criminals?

A: Today, understanding cyber criminals have realized that they can take advantage of AI and machine learning to develop automated and evolving viruses. This allows the virus to change and avoid detection for a longer period of time when the virus spreads throughout the network and infects new devices. Like human viruses, this is very dangerous when they “evolve,” or changing their code becomes more difficult to resist and prevent.

Criminals use machine learning and AI to do many things throughout the life of an attack, such as gathering information about targets, imitating approved users, carrying out actual attacks, and automating exploitation activities.
Q: Does this type of malware pose a greater threat to business than traditional malware?

A: Of course. This malware is far more difficult to detect in real time because it always changes its signature. To detect this threat, we need to fight fire with fire.

In Malwarebytes, we have used a machine learning component that detects malware that has never been seen before in the wild, also known as zero-day. In addition, other components of our software perform behavior-based heuristic detection, which means they may not recognize certain codes as dangerous, but they have determined that a file or website acts in a way that should not be done. This technology is also based on AI and machine learning.
Protect your SMB – and you – from malware attacks
Q: What can small businesses do to protect themselves from hackers and malware?

A: Apart from the significant strength that SME vulnerabilities have for attackers, there are a number of simple solutions to prevent them from becoming problematic:

Use a layered security approach. Deploy complementary products that leave no gap for cyber criminals to be exploited. Look holistically at your current security tools and evaluate how to eliminate gaps using a layered security approach. You must review your organization’s specific needs, but you may want to consider things like endpoint security, encryption, firewalls, and identity and access management.

Patch your system. Basic maintenance can counteract many problems. For example, cyber criminals can easily exploit the default software vulnerabilities on the Windows operating system. These criminals monitor websites to find out the latest general vulnerabilities and exposures (CVE) and then develop software exploits that exploit vulnerabilities.

Train your staff. Invest in regular and ongoing training for your employees to help them recognize the latest security threats, including phishing emails and other social engineering tactics. Also, make sure your first respondent, or those who have access to customer sensitive data or proprietary rights, are experienced in cyber security best practices.

Q: Why do cyber criminals focus on small businesses?

A: SMEs are often more vulnerable than large companies because they usually lack the resources and bandwidth to hire special security teams. Even though they are not as profitable as company targets, they are significantly more vulnerable and offer a significant amount of data compared to target consumers. In addition, small business owners are more likely to pay ransom, because they may not have a backup of their important data.

Small businesses can also be accessed as gateways to larger companies or other small business networks, unlocking bigger prizes for cyber criminals. For example, criminals can spread malware to Inbenta Technologies customer support products, which then allows them to compromise personal data and payment details for thousands of Ticketmaster customers.

Unfortunately, with fewer resources, small businesses also tend to catch criminals targeting them. Criminals feel the risk versus reward ratio is higher when it comes to SMEs.
Q: Besides malware, what types of cyber threats are the most vulnerable for small businesses?

A: To be clear, there are many types of malware, including ransomware, worms, Trojans, cryptomining, spyware, adware, and maliklan. Some of them are really malignant, while others may only drain your system – but all must be dealt with quickly to ensure the business can continue to run efficiently and safely.

Other types of cyber threats that small businesses must prepare to address include distributed denial of service attacks (DDoS), insider threats and employee errors and errors.

Business has become a prime target for criminals, according to Malactic Cyber ​​Crime Tactics and Techniques Report. Compared to Q1 2018, business detection of threats skyrocketed 235%, and according to Accenture, malware is a threat. 1 for the organization, followed by web-based attacks, denial of service and evil insiders.
Quick question
Q: What technology can’t you turn on without it?

A: My cellphone. Being in security has made me hesitate to wear too many items that can be worn like iWatch, but I can’t live without my cellphone. Like many people, I work all the time. My device is part of me, connecting me to personal and corporate applications.

Of course, this is a concern for our chief information security officer, because my device represents the door to Malwarebytes, and it needs to be secured. Every executive I know carries at least one mobile device at any time.

In fact, the average US has eight network devices per person, the number of which is expected to increase to 13 by 2022. Each of these devices is