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For the Average Traveler Who Needs Money Saving Travel Tips

Many families are finding it hard to come up with the money to take a vacation, with the rise in prices for almost everything in the last few years. But taking a vacation does not have to be expensive. There are many money saving travel tips to be found to save the average traveler a lot of money.

Regardless of age or income, everyone can benefit from money saving travel tips. Whether aiming for a four-star, week-long vacation or a weekend getaway, there are travel tips that can save you money to be found with a little searching. These tips can save you money on everything from hotels, to airfare, to food.

Money Saving Travel Tips For Lodging

One of the best money saving travel tips for saving money on lodging is compare prices. Prices for hotel rooms can vary greatly, even if the hotels are located close to each other. If booking a hotel room online, check several different sites for the same hotel rooms. Chances are the price on one site will be lower than the prices on other sites. Another way to save is with a Travel Membership.

Another tip for saving on lodging is” try to be flexible”. For example, in Hilton Head, a hotel room with an ocean view is more than twice as much per night than the hotel room with all of the same amenities but without an ocean view directly across the street. If you are intending to spend your vacation days on the beach, an ocean view may not be necessary and that extra money could be spent towards something else. With a little research, money saving travel tips can save you quite a bit of money over the length of your vacation.

Money Saving Travel Tips For Dining

One of the biggest expenses of any vacation is food. With some money saving travel tips and a little prior planning, you can minimize the amount that you will pay for dining. The first tip is to research restaurants in the area before leaving on vacation. This way you know what types of restaurants are in the area and the price ranges for these restaurants. Many people on vacation walk into a restaurant that they have never been in before and pay a much higher price than they intended to spend for the meal. By choosing which restaurants you will eat in before you leave for the trip, you will eliminate the possibility of sticker shock when you see the menu.

One of the most overlooked money saving travel tips for dining is to request from the city you are planning to travel to, a guide to the local restaurants. Many of these guides include money saving coupons to restaurants in the area to entice you into eating there. Whether the coupon is for 10% off or 50% off, they are still saving you money you would have had to spend anyway. By doing a little research and learning some money saving travel tips, a vacation does not have to be as expensive as expected.

You can also get lodging that comes with a fully equipped kitchen, so you can cook some of your own meals. Most places you vacation have a local grocery store or deli near by. This is a great way to save. On a romantic get away you can do breakfast in bed and be spoiled by your love. If you have the family with you, having a kitchen will save you a ton of money on food. Just make sure Mom gets a break from the kitchen. Remember, this is her vacation too.

Loch Lomond, Loch Ness, Glencoe and puppies

Today our trip to the edge of Bonnie Bonnie on Loch Lomond begins with an unusual sight, the sun. This is the first morning where old Sol decides to bless us with his presence. Great Scottish green under a clear sky.

A word about the Tour Director. Imaging does work where you act as a mother to 30 people you have never met, all of whom have ideas about travel, food, holidays, accommodation, and needs. Also imagine, that you are on call 24 hours a day, must plan activities every day, and make sure everyone is safe, happy, and on time. This is only a small concept from the Tour Director’s work. No matter what tour company you use, the Tour Director is very important for quality and enjoying your tour.

To add insult to injury, Tour Directors were not properly compensated for the amount of work they did mainly because they were very important for the success of the tour experience. They are expected to be experienced in history, archeology, culinary expertise, safety, culture and various other skills. They also work 14, 20 or 24 consecutive days without holidays. They must prepare their own talks about the tour and make all arrangements for dinner, optional and everything that makes the tour successful. Not everyone can be a tour director, so, for those, like Tom, who do extraordinary work, they deserve special thanks and make sure you tell them how much you appreciate their hard work and make sure you value them with your tip, they really rely on this percent.

Our first stop is Loch Lomond. We left the luxury of our coach and took a private ferry to tour the lake for 45 minutes. One must have a direct relationship with the gods of the weather, because when the coach rains, when we go down it stops, when we return to the coach it rains again. So for the gods, “Thank you.”

The cruise revolves around the important part of the loch. Along the way our captain, Stewart, showed historic and beautiful places of interest. We also learned that the prefix INVER means on the river, so Inverness means the city on the river Ness. It’s good to know when we travel around Scotland. The beauty of the lake, coupled with the majesty of the storm clouds, is made for some extraordinary photos. Once again it rained when we were on the ship. Now, we go to the next stop, go north to Glencoe.

Why Disaster Recovery Should Be Part of Your Holiday Planning

While executives often feel the organization is very ready to recover from data loss or damage, their IT professionals say. Being dark for days at a time can significantly change income income for small businesses, especially during the busy holiday shopping season.

If your small business has a busy holiday shopping season, disaster recovery readiness should be a major part of your vacation planning process. A 2016 survey revealed a huge disconnect between C-suites and IT professionals in terms of how ready they were to think their organization would handle disasters. While almost 70 percent of level C executives feel their organization is “very prepared” to recover from data loss or damage, less than 50 percent of IT professionals in the same organization agree.

Many businesses make the most of their annual income during the Q4 holiday season. Being dark for days at a time can significantly change income income for small businesses. Read on to better understand the risks posed by losing data and what elements small businesses must include in their disaster recovery plans.
The top risk caused by loss of data

With advancements in business software, your business is likely to rely on cloud-based technology to carry out your daily operations. If one of these services goes down, your business can be paralyzed – unable to process sales, offer products or services online, linking your order collection efforts with your order fulfillment operations, or accessing your employees’ salaries to record working hours.

Your data can be permanently lost after an outage or error. In the 2015 Data Violation Investigation Report, Verizon found that small data violations (less than 100 missing files) could cost businesses $ 18,120 to $ 35,730. It’s not a small line item, and it doesn’t even cover a larger data breach. Furthermore, according to the National Archives and Archives Administration, more than 90 percent of companies experience at least seven days of data center downtime out of business in a year.

As businesses increasingly move online and software helps companies process customer preferences and purchase history, your small business can now capture more customer information and financial data than ever before. This data, including the finances of your own business, is very attractive to computer hackers. Hacking skills are becoming more common, and hacking incidents begin to affect large and small businesses. Hackers violate more than 50 percent of 28 million American small businesses, according to the State of SMB Cybersecurity Report 2016. A hacker can not only steal your financial data or customers, but also delete information as a whole to cover their tracks. This can cause your business to face serious operational challenges, especially regarding accounting and tax payments.

Natural disasters such as floods, earthquakes, hurricanes, snowstorms, and other extreme storms can cause data centers or online services to experience downtime as well. Locally stored files, such as those on a server or hard drive, can be easily deleted because of a power surge caused by storms, fire, water damage, or even just dropped or destroyed.

Finally, loss or theft of your customer’s data can harm your business due to lawsuits and fines. For larger businesses, data loss that leads to a significant reduction in company value or shares can result in shareholder lawsuits. Be sure to note whether your business or vendor contract contains a clause related to data protection requirements.
An important element of a disaster recovery plan

Cloud service leverage. Saving data in the cloud and improving cloud-based programs can help businesses solve problems four times faster than businesses that use files or local storage. Data stored in the cloud is not subject to general data loss or causes of damage such as power surges, water damage, fire, or damage solely such as dropping or destroying a hard drive.

While executives often feel organizations are very ready to recover from data loss or damage, their IT professionals say. Being dark for days at a time can significantly change income for small businesses, especially during the busy holiday shopping season.

If your small business has a busy holiday shopping season, disaster recovery readiness should be a major part of your vacation planning process. A 2016 survey revealed a huge disconnect between C-suites and IT professionals in terms of how ready they were to think their organization would handle disasters. While almost 70 percent of level C executives feel their organization is “very prepared” to recover from data loss or damage, less than 50 percent of IT professionals in the same organization agree.

Many businesses make up a large portion of their annual income during the Q4 holiday season. Being dark for days at a time can significantly change income for small businesses. Read on to better understand the risks posed by losing data and what elements small businesses must include in their disaster recovery plans.
The highest risk is caused by loss of data

With advancements in business software, your business tends to rely on cloud-based technology to run your daily operations. If one of these services goes down, your business can be paralyzed – unable to process sales, offer products or services online, connect your order collection efforts with your order fulfillment operations, or access your employees’ salaries to record working hours.

Your data can be lost permanently after a blackout or error. In the 2015 Data Violation Investigation Report, Verizon found that small data violations (less than 100 files missing) could cost businesses $ 18,120 to $ 35,730. This is not a small line item, and does not even cover a larger data breach. Furthermore, according to the National Archives and Administration Agency, more than 90 percent of business companies experience at least seven days of data center downtime from the business in a year.

As businesses increasingly move online and software helps companies process customer preferences and purchase history, your small business can now capture more customer information and financial data than ever before. This data, including the finances of your own business, is very attractive to computer hackers. Hacking skills are becoming more common, and hacking incidents begin to affect large and small businesses. Hackers violate more than 50 percent of 28 million American small businesses, according to the State of the SMB Cybersecurity Report 2016. A hacker can not only steal financial data or your customers, but also delete information as a whole to cover their tracks. This can cause your business to face serious operational challenges, especially related to accounting and payment of taxes.

Natural disasters such as floods, earthquakes, storms, snowstorms, and other extreme storms can cause data centers or online services to experience downtime as well. Locally stored files, such as those on the server or hard drive, can be easily removed because of power surges caused by storms, fire, water damage, or even just falling or breaking.

Finally, loss or theft of your customer’s data can harm your business due to lawsuits and fines. For larger businesses, loss of data that leads to a significant decrease in the value or shares of the company can result in shareholder lawsuits. Be sure to note whether your business or vendor contract contains clauses related to data protection requirements.
An important element of a disaster recovery plan

Cloud service leverage. Saving data in the cloud and improving cloud-based programs can help businesses solve problems four times faster than businesses that use files or local storage. Data stored in the cloud is not subject to general data loss or causes of damage such as power surges, water damage, fire, or damage solely such as dropping or destroying the hard drive.

Deception Pass State Park

Yesterday was our last day at Whidbey. We made a short trip to the Fraud State Park for hiking. This is a nice park with several winding paths along the coast. Beautiful scenery Images speak for themselves.

Whidbey Naval Air Station is a joy to visit. The RV park is one of the best we have ever used. Right on the water and very clean and well maintained. That is the experience of being around this part of the Navy again. Whidbey now has several P3 squadrons and several new P8 squadrons. It also has some new EP3 and F / A 18 Growler. We flew a lot here in the 60s and 70s to take torpedoes and do mining exercises. At that time the post was small and was home to several P2 squadrons. There isn’t much activity. Now it’s busy all the time and lots of traffic. The Navy has changed a lot since I retired in 1994. All sailors are now wearing camouflage uniforms and I can’t say how many people. I go to the head club which is only open 4 days a week. Two camouflage people are
sit at the bar. I don’t even know whether they are tribal chiefs. They looked at me as if I was a bully. I want to tell them that I retired as a Senior Head before they even joined as an E1 pilot. Instead I walked in disgust. That’s not my Navy anymore. I think that’s what happened with age.

Today we drive from Whidbey to Lincoln City Oregon. Easy drive with lots of traffic most of the way. KOA RV Park is good, but not compared to Whidbey. Tomorrow we will go to McMinnville to see the Spruce Goose. After that we plan to visit several major wineries in this area.

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ATV ADVENTURE AT TABANAN, BALI

ATV ADVENTURE AT TABANAN, BALI

In mid-May 2019, I was invited to play ATV Bali Beach by Paddy Adventure Bali. Incidentally one of the owners is my brother named Ronald. I used to call him Mas Rony. While waiting to be picked up by Mas Rony, I first jogged along the lines of Seminyak Beach and Double Six Beach. Around 9 am, finally a pickup car from Paddy Adventure to the front of the hotel where I stay in the Seminyak area. The trip to Tabanan from Seminyak itself takes around less than 2 hours. During the trip, we passed through rice fields and traditional villages. Bali’s beautiful and calm natural atmosphere reminds me of the Ubud area. The difference is, in Ubud the natural conditions have been cultivated and development is more developed. Whereas in Tabanan, the landscape of the land is still very natural and development is not as fast as in the area of ​​Ubud.

Tabanan landscape
Around 10 o’clock, we arrive at Paddy Adventure base camp located on the hill. This building consists of 3 main masses, where each mass of the building must be reached by climbing the steps of the stairs. The first is the recipient building where there is an open space that functions as a lobby, as well as a registration room. After filling out the registration form, I go up to the top of the base camp. The second building mass is the restaurant area. Here I was treated to a welcome drink of fresh orange ice while waiting for my turn to ride an ATV. After the turn, I was accompanied by Mas Rony to the ATV area.

In this ATV area there is a locker for storing personal items and bathrooms. Once finished wearing boots and storing items in the locker, Mas and Rony immediately chose which ATV vehicle we would ride. Before plunging into the adventure route, I practice first to get used to the vehicle that I choose. Besides Mas Rony, I will walk along with a large pair of Russian tourists, and two members of the Bali Land Rover. Most of the ATV lanes that we will pass are rice fields which are quite extensive and hilly areas. The first track we passed was in the form of mud and large enough stones at the bottom. This ATV engine does not have power steering, so it must use energy from the entire body to control it. After the muddy area, the road directly goes downhill and we arrive at the asphalt area.

The initial track is quite relaxed, by passing the concrete track in the middle of the rice fields belonging to local residents. The beautiful landscape of Tabanan makes us occasionally stop for photographs. At first I felt uncomfortable with local residents who often met us, this was due to the sound of the ATV engine which was rather noisy. Actually the sound is normal, but because in the paddy field the natural atmosphere is quite calm so it still seems noisy. But not according to my estimates, it turns out the surrounding population is quite friendly. My brother said, the Paddy Adventure guides themselves were local residents too.

Rice field atmosphere in Tabanan

 After passing through the rice fields, the road starts to get steep and muddy. One of them is the road decreases where after reaching below we have to turn right to the right. The condition of the land is quite slippery due to the mud caused by heavy rain throughout the night. Most novice riders don’t want to continue once they see this field. Some even want to jump when an ATV is sliding down. The trick when facing a steep terrain is that we cannot rotate the gas. Simply glide following gravity, and control the ATV with our body weight. Once you get to the bottom, we immediately turn to the right and immediately step on the gas. Not bad enough to trigger adrenaline … In addition, we also pass through a ditch that has a water level up to our knees when we stand in it. Here we don’t need to step on the gas too deep, just second gear and move slowly. The bottom of the trench which is a rock also helps traction on ATV tires.

  After circling the terrain which is quite heavy for 1 hour, we rest in the hilly area. Fresh rural air and a quiet atmosphere is really right for refreshing, far from the heat of the city. While resting, Mas Rony also talked a lot about Paddy Adventure, ATV machines used, and maintenance. Not infrequently the driver who most beginners often fall, even desperate to jump. Aside from being dangerous to the driver itself, this certainly causes the ATV to experience considerable damage. Overall, the selected track is indeed very challenging. Especially in the trench area where the water flow is quite heavy and the weight of ATV is around 300 kg which we must control. But that’s where the adrenaline drives us.